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The Pirate Party is now measured as the second biggest party in Iceland

Jón Hákon Halldórsson skrifar
Helgi Hrafni Gunnarsson, a member of the Parliament for the Pirate Party, is at loss of words when Fréttablaðið asks him about the results of the survey.
Helgi Hrafni Gunnarsson, a member of the Parliament for the Pirate Party, is at loss of words when Fréttablaðið asks him about the results of the survey. Vísir/GVA

The Pirate Party would get about 22% of the total votes if parliamentary elections would take place now, according to the results of Fréttablaðið's survey. This means that party would have fourteen members of the Parliament. In total, there are 63 members of the Icelandic Parliament. That is eleven more members of the Parliament than they had in the parliamentary elections in 2013.

However, the Independence Party (Sjálfstæðisflokkurinn), one of the ruling parties, is the biggest party. They would have 19 members of the Parliament, the same number as they had in the last parliamentary elections. The Progressive Party (Framsóknarflokkurinn), the party of the Prime Minister, would have six members of the Parliament and would lose thirteen members of the Parliament since the last elections.

The Social Democratic Alliance (Samfylkingin) would be the third biggest party with eleven elected members of the parliament.  The Left Green Party (Vinstri grænir) would have seven members of the parliament, the same number as the party had in the last parliamentary elections. Bright Future (Björt framtíð) would have six members of the parliament, the same number as in the last parliamentary elections.

If that would be the result of the elections, then only one two-party government would be possible. That would the government of the Independence Party and the Pirate Party.

Helgi Hrafn Gunnarsson, a member of the Parliament for the Pirate Party, is at loss of words when Fréttablaðið asks him about the results of the survey. "I'm happy to see such a reception, but you also need to keep this. Firstly, it's not self-evident that this will be the result of the elections and not self-evident that this will go on. It's important not to become arrogant because of this," Helgi Hrafn says.

"You can just hope that the reason is that people like what we have to say," he says.

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